Starting A Content Creation Business With An iPhone

Whenever I get off work or feel stressed—Instagram comedy skits are the quickest way to ginger myself back to life. But then I started to get curious about whether or not these people make money or if it is even a business in the first place.

Then I found that content creation and influencing business has proven to be profitable in recent times, but only a few have got the hang of it. Ugwu Perpetua Chinagorom started a content creation brand with just an iPhone and a clear goal—and she has taken the space by storm with her Unique content style.

We had a chat with her to walk us through everything that goes into her content creation business in 2022, as we consider her an influencer in the comedy skit space.

How long have you been making content? And what prompted your interest in it?

I started putting out content full time in February of 2017 via musically (now TikTok).

I had just gotten my first iPhone, a 6s plus. I was bored, and I wanted to make the most of it. And then, from there, I realised I had some other content ideas. I was in my third year of University at the time; I used to make all my skits from my hostel.

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Considering that you’re one of the Og’s in skit making, do you consider yourself a trendsetter in that space?

There were many people in that space before me, from CrazeClown to Maraji and so on. I just wanted to come into that space to be able to share my ideas with a larger audience…for me, it was just for fun.

Which social media platform works best for you in establishing your presence?

Instagram has played a significant role in my career as a content creator, but sometimes I’m pissed at myself for not trying out other platforms like Facebook, YouTube, and Twitter.

What goes into the preparation process of your content?

It’s not an instant process at all, sometimes—I sit on my own just thinking about what I want to do and all that. The process is carefully thought out. I already have my outfits set up, then I proceed to film and edit myself.

So it’s just a one-person circus. I do everything myself because I have a vision for my content, and I feel outsourcing might not work for me.

How much were you paid for your first gig?

Hmm, the first-ever paid influencers gig I did—I got paid about #30,000. It was a long time ago, but the progress and process are different now. Although I’m not cheap, my services are affordable, and I like to fashion my collaborations based on my page engagements.

What was your first ever skit and first viral skit?

I don’t remember it per se, but it was centred on something about Valentine’s Day, so I published it in February of 2017. And my first viral skit was centred on something about “mothers not letting you go out and expecting you to get married”.

Is your content creation brand a business for you, or do you have a 9-5?

No, I don’t have a 9-5–this is all I do, so I consider it my business. It’s how I get paid. Although I don’t do my skits for money, 70% of my work is for fun. So money is not necessarily the priority.

What counts as income and expense as a content creator?

My incomes are the adverts and endorsement deals. Then my expenses are essentially my filming gear, tripod, phone and ring light because I continue to upgrade my phone to make sure that I can catch up quality-wise.

How do you negotiate your pay with brands?

The process is pretty easy because I know my engagement and price; I never undersell myself. Sometimes they would try to price cut; I stand firm on my decisions—especially when I know the value of what I bring to the table.

What are your biggest challenges right now as a content creator?

Instagram is volatile; your account could get hacked, or Instagram could not exist anymore.

The next challenge is the competition; I’m not just a content creator; I’m a comedy skit maker. And that space is so saturated that many people out there are showcasing their talents as well. So everyone wants to get noticed.

It’s so bad that if you think of a skit idea today, randomly and coincidentally, another skit maker will put out the exact idea you created.

Another thing is the trolls, every one of them says whatever they like to you—insult you and try to demean you, which takes a toll on my mental health sometimes. Not as much anyway, because I’ve learnt to tune them out.

What is the craziest thing that happened to you as a content creator?

Oh, the craziest one that has happened to me was when a brand reached out to me for an endorsement deal but asked me to pay them and then they’ll refund my money and pay me. It was so funny to think of how bold they were to offer that kind of scam with their full chest.

Final question, based on your experiences, what would you recommend to other creators?

Honestly, it’s something you hear repeatedly, but don’t give up. Try and try again.

It took hard work for me to get noticed; I’m grateful to KraksTV, DonJazzy, PulseNG and Tunde Ednut for reposting my skits to their audience. It was the confidence boost I needed at the time to continue and not stop.

Perpetuachris on instagram


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Hafeedoh Balogun

Hafeedoh Balogun